Beyond Adversity

Enjoying Life After Adversity

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Disability-Related Hate Crime

2015-1218 Disability Related Hate Crime

Disclaimer

The following information appeared in an article on the site Disability Scoop. I do not know if Disability Scoop wrote the article or shared it from elsewhere. Furthermore, I did not check facts in the article. In my mind, the specific rate of increase is much less significant than the fact it increased at all. An increase in any hate crime is intolerable. Hating someone because they are different is a sign of cowardice, low confidence, and lack of education.

Article as it Appeared on Disability Scoop

New federal data indicates the number of reported hate crimes targeting people with disabilities has ticked up.

There were 95 hate crime offenses related to disability bias last year, according to recently released statistics from the FBI’s Uniform Crime Reporting Program. The 2014 numbers are up slightly compared to the previous year when the FBI recorded 92 offenses targeting people with disabilities.

At the same time, however, the overall number of hate crimes documented fell to 5,479 criminal incidents in 2014.

In addition to disability, the FBI collects hate crimes statistics on criminal incidents motivated by a bias toward a particular race, religion, sexual orientation, gender, gender identity or ethnicity.

The data is drawn from reports gathered by nearly 15,500 law enforcement agencies nationwide.

Disability bias accounted for 1.4 percent of all hate crimes logged in 2014. Of them, 69 were committed against people with mental disabilities and 26 were aimed at those with physical disabilities, the FBI said.

Credits

Click here to read another Beyond Adversity post.

Thanks to Michelle Diament for writing the article I noticed; Disability Scoop for committing its resources to the article; Kathleen Galligan, and the Detroit Free Press/TNS for their involvement; all agencies, organizations, groups, and individuals who collect hate crime statistics on criminal incidents motivated by a bias toward a particular race, religion, sexual orientation, gender, gender identity, or ethnicity; Google for helping me find the article; Kathleen Galligan, and the Detroit Free Press/TNS for their involvement;  and all the people who, directly or indirectly, made it possible to include the picture and text in this post.

Scott
Even after brain surgeries, chemotherapy, and radiation treatments to eradicate his brain cancer, Scott continued to work; continued to study; and earned professional certifications from the Project Management Institute, American Society of Quality, and Stanford University School of Professional Development. How were all of these achievements possible at a time when Scott was struggling with the hurdles of brain injury? The answers are in this blog.


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**** About The Author ****

During the past 13 years, I have been diagnosed with cancer, brain injury, balance issues, stroke, ataxia, visual impairment, and auditory challenges. I have overcome significant adversity! I can explain how to overcome your challenges. I am a very active Toastmaster and a motivational speaker.