Beyond Adversity

Enjoying Life After Adversity

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He Claims Stroke Was A Gift

Stroke SymptomsAlthough I am not familiar with the policies of Senator Mark Kirk, I thought I should write a post about the typical symptoms of stroke (picture on left) and recovery from stroke. Even though the symptoms of stroke will vary from person to person, the basic signs of stroke will be similar — drooping face, uneven smile, numbness in one or both arms, and slurred speech. A stroke should be treated immediately. Even though it may be difficult, exhausting, and time consuming, recovery is possible.

A Dream Come True, One Step at a Time

Shortly after my tumor was discovered, I began to think about returning to my old normal. Many therapists (physical and cognitive) suggested that I progress one step at a time. Apparently, Senator Mark Kirk, who may have received similar advice, took the advice literally rather than figuratively.

Questions

  1. What specific challenges are you trying to overcome during your recovery?
  2. How do you measure success in your recovery?
  3. Is your goal of recovery achievable?
  4. Is your goal of recovery realistic?
  5. On what date do you expect to achieve your recovery goal?

Thanks to Celeste for suggesting I write a post about the Senator’s recovery from stroke, Senator Mark Kirk for sharing his story, CBS News and TPM for covering the story, YouTube for sharing the video, and all the other people who contributed to the picture and/or video I included in this post.

Scott
Even after brain surgeries, chemotherapy, and radiation treatments to eradicate his brain cancer, Scott continued to work; continued to study; and earned professional certifications from the Project Management Institute, American Society of Quality, and Stanford University School of Professional Development. How were all of these achievements possible at a time when Scott was struggling with the hurdles of brain injury? The answers are in this blog.

4 Responses to “He Claims Stroke Was A Gift”

  • norm.wyman says:

    Wow! That guy is pretty incredible. God is incredible! Thanks for sharing, I better get my “butt in gear” (as my Dad used to say).

    Although I’ve come a long way after my stroke, raising two baby boys, I feel way humbled after watching that!

    • Scott says:

      Norm, I have looked up to you as long as I have known you. I am convinced there is nothing that can hold you back from overcoming your challenges. You manage to do more than most people in spite of your adversity. My guess is you will continue to inspire others to do their best and to be happy in the face of adversity. Thank you for providing feedback.

  • MaLou S Santos says:

    Thank you for sharing this very vital information. Knowing what to do and what not to do at the onset of a stroke could save lives. It could be your own or those of the people you love or even that of a stranger.

    • Scott says:

      MaLou, Knowledge is extremely important, but it only works well when partnered with communication. Unless people know what stroke is AND how to help, the knowledge is less valuable. Thank you for sharing your comments.


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**** About The Author ****

During the past 13 years, I have been diagnosed with cancer, brain injury, balance issues, stroke, ataxia, visual impairment, and auditory challenges. I have overcome significant adversity! I can explain how to overcome your challenges. I am a very active Toastmaster and a motivational speaker.