Impersonating Herself

Disclaimer

2014-0429 Amy Cuddy

Frank Pray shared the interview of Amy Cuddy with me. The interview was conducted by The Story Collider. Clicking the link under the heading “Podcast” will navigate you from Beyond Injury to The Sound Collider website. For those who are not familiar with the term “podcast,” Google defines a podcast as a “digital audio file made available on the Internet for downloading to a computer or portable media player.” In other words, a podcast is simply an audio file. Those of you who are looking for a video will not find one in this post.

Introduction

After a terrible head injury, Amy Cuddy wakes up in the hospital to find she’s a different person.

Podcast

Click here to listen to the 20 minute podcast.

Credits

Click here for a Beyond Injury post that contains a video.

Thanks to Frank Pray for telling me about the podcast; Amy Cuddy for sharing her experiences;  The Story Collider for committing its resources to interviewing Cuddy; Google for helping me find the picture I used in this post; and all the people who, directly or indirectly, made it possible for me to include the picture, podcast, and text I used in this post.

According to The Story Collider, “Amy Cuddy is a social psychologist and Harvard Business School Associate Professor who studies how snap judgments and nonverbal behavior affect people from the classroom to the boardroom. Amy Cuddy’s fascinating work on “power posing” reveals how your physical posture affects not only how others see you, but also how you see yourself, your own hormone levels, and your performance and important life outcomes. Researching stereotypes, emotions, nonverbal behaviors, and hormone levels, Amy explains to audiences the role these variables play in shaping our emotions, intentions and behaviors in business and society. Amy’s work has been featured on CNN, MSNBC, The New York Times, The Financial Times, Scientific American Mind, The Wall Street Journal, and even as the theme of a Dilbert comic strip. Business Insider just named Amy as one of 2013’s “50 Women Who are Changing the World. Her TED Talk is now the second most viewed of all time. She is also a classically trained (and still practicing) ballet dancer.”

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